Roundhouse Student Journal

People

Executive Editorial Committee

Ben Hirst

Ben Hirst is a Doctoral Research Candiate in the Bauman Institute. His research is primarily concerned with the role and function of art education in the UK over the last decade, with a particular focus on the emergence of alternative art education movements in response to conditions of uncertainty in HE.

Allie Hughes

Allie Hughes is a PhD researcher of Social Policy, interested in gender identities and healthcare access. More specifically, she hopes to tease out the interplay and inconsistencies between social and medical perceptions of gender identities through qualitative realist evaluation. Other research interests include; queer and feminist theories, intersectional feminisms, ethics of care, and action research methods.

Though this is Allie’s first year working with Roundhouse, she has previous experience as an executive editor of the inaugural edition of the Leeds Journal of Law and Criminology (2013).

Jack Palmer

Jack Palmer is a Doctoral Research Candidate in The Bauman Institute. His research is concerned with understanding the experience of genocide, war and failled democratic transitions in Africa’s Great Lakes region. This region has appeared shorn of the notions of modernity, civilisation and globality upon which the ‘developed’ world is founded. Jack’s research aims to counter this representation by demonstrating that despite the singularities of each episode of violence in the region, what unites them are macro-level, historical forces borne of the imposition of the very notions outlined above, having their roots in ‘civilising processes’ associated with ‘ Western’ modernity and European colonialism.

Honorary Editor

Dr Tom Campbell

Tom Campbell is a Lecturer in Social Theory at the University of Leeds and Deputy Director of The Bauman Institute. His research is primarily concerned with how shifts in the economy re-draw the contours of how individuals and populations are valued, as well as Italian neo-Marxist theories of cognitive capitalism and finance. His most recent book, Dyslexia: The Government of Reading (2013), explores how changes in the rationalities of government and economic developments problematised the variance in human capabilities we have come to call dyslexia.

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