Roundhouse Student Journal

The State of Pedagogy and the University

The aim of this panel discussion is to try to form a clearer picture of how we perceive higher education today. What are the key changes over recent years which have impacted on higher education? What forces act to restrict the freedoms of academics and students? Why have these forces manifested themselves in such a way? How are pressures on education distorting educational practice? We hope to address these, and other, questions in order to present an outline for the themes which we would like to look at for the rest of the day.

Panel

Andrew Gunn’s research considers knowledge transfer and exchange in the social sciences, critical analysis of the knowledge economy concept and the idea of ‘knowledge’ as a resource for development, the use of higher-education policy as a form of industrial policy, the relationship between universities and the state, and analysing modern universities with an appreciation of the changing boundaries between the public and the private and the state and market.

Professor Dennis Hayes is a Professor of Education at the University of Derby and a visiting professor at Oxford Brookes University. In 2006 – 2007, he was the first joint president of the University and College Union. He founded the campaign group Academics for Academic Freedom and since 2004 has been the convenor of the Institute of Ideas’ Education Forum.

Lea Medeiros is a founding member of the Roundhouse Group. A law student in Sao Paulo, Brazil, she is completing a thesis applying the work of Antonio Gramsci to the development of US law.

Professor Mike Neary began his career as an educator on community projects in South London in the 1980s. In 2007 he was appointed as the Dean of Teaching and Learning at the University of Lincoln. His work is inspired by Marxist critical social theory as expressed in Capital and Grundrisse, and has included an alternative political economy of student life, an examination of the idea of the university based on the work of Henri Lefebvre, and an application of Walter Benjamin’s critical theory to undergraduate education.

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